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News at Brighter Green

Brighter Green Releases Summary on Forthcoming Nature's Rights Paper 10/14/14

Brighter Green released a summary of a forthcoming nature's rights paper entitled Nature's Rights: Rivers, Trees, Whales, and Apes.

Jim Harkness Positively Reviews "What's For Dinner?" 10/6/14

Jim Harkness Senior Advisor on China at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy positively reviews "What's For Dinner?" and interviews Executive Director Mia MacDonald.

Brighter Green Associate Interviewed by "Eating Animals" Director, Christopher Quinn 9/29/14

Brighter Green Associate Wanqing Zhou was interviewed by Eating Animals director Christopher Quinn. BG also provided Mr. Quinn Chinese contacts, including What's For Dinner? director Jian Yi, for the film.

Brighter Green Associate Wanqing Zhou interviewed by Our Hen House 7/23/14

Brighter Green Associate Wanqing Zhou was interviewed by Our Hen House on Brighter Green's What's For Dinner? and China screening tour in June and July 2014.

Brighter Green and Partner Global Forest Coalition Published in "Square Brackets" 7/1/14

Brighter Green and partner Global Forest Coalition published their article "Implementing Aichi Target 3 in the livestock sector" in "Square Brackets: CBD Newsletter for Civil Society".

Brighter Green Releases June 2014 Newsletter 6/27/14

Brighter Green releases its June 2014 newsletter highlighting achievements and events in the first part of 2014. You can view the newsletter here.

Brighter Green Launches "What's For Dinner?" China Screening Tour 6/15/14

Brighter Green launches the China tour of the short documentary film "What's For Dinner?". The film is screened in multiple cities through July 2014 and provinces including Beijing, Shanghai, and Zhejiang province. To learn more please click here.

Brighter Green Presents at the Global Research Forum on Sustainable Production and Consumption 6/11/14

Brighter Green Associate Wanqing Zhou presented her paper, "The Triangle: Factory Farming in the U.S., China and Brazil" in Shanghai, China at the Global Research Forum on Production and Consumption.

BG Partner Global Forest Coalition Releases Paraguayan Case Study 5/22/14

Brighter Green partner Global Forest Coalition publishes Paraguayan case study on the environmental and social impacts of unsustainable livestock and soybean production.

Brighter Green and Global Forest Coalition New Report and Briefing Paper 5/22/14

Brighter Green and the Global Forest Coalition announce the release of a new report and briefing paper on redirecting government support for unsustainable livestock production as the key to biodiversity conservation.

Brighter Green Appears in the Scientific American Magazine 5/20/14

The Scientific American article "China's Appetite for Meat Swells, Along with Climate Changing Pollution" references Brighter Green research as well as quotes Executive Director Mia MacDonald and Associate Wanqing Zhou.

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The Texting Dairy Cow

October 12, 2012 12:00pm
Filed under:

Dairy cows send texts via probes

The latest advancement in animal agriculture: offering cows the ability to send text messages to farmers when they are, uh, feeling amorous.
A newly developed sensor-activated device, being used by some Swiss dairy producers, is implanted into the uterus of dairy cows. As the cow goes into heat, the device sends a text message to the farmer, alerting that it’s time for artificial insemination. New York Times Swiss Cows Send Texts to Announce They're in Heat

But why the need for such intrusive technology? The stress on cows resulting from their forced-overproduction of milk, a characteristic of today’s dairy industry, has upset cow’s metabolism, causing the animals to show fewer signs of ovulation. This is leading the traditional ”visual inspection” method to become obsolete.

The use of this device is disconcerting on many fronts. It is indicative of the stress these animals’ bodies are forced to endure. Perhaps their lack of reproductive signals is a biological protection mechanism; nature has responded and their bodies are saying, “No more!” But rather than reducing the stress placed on the animals, the industry ignores nature and simply creates ways to work around it.

Another reason the texting device is so disconcerting is its symbolism: of an industry that commodifies fertility, disparages nature, and objectifies femininity.

Photo courtesy of The Digital Story